Archives for apm magazine


Bruno Kahne – Deaf-Tips, Powerful Communication

BrunokahneBruno leads a team of consultants, trainers, facilitators and coaches who are experts in Human Performance. Before joining AirBusiness Academy, he worked as an auditor, trainer and consultant in leadership, management, self-development, communication and change management, for companies specialised in fields as varied as the nuclear, supermarket, food, and construction industry.

Bruno holds an M.A. from the Université de Mons in Belgium and completed his PhD in Sociology from the University of Exeter.

A year ago Bruno spoke to a deaf person for the first time, as a communication coach and long term enthusiast Bruno was unprepared for how much of an impact this would have on him and how much the deaf world can teach the hearing about communication.

“In this world that is getting more and more complex we have a tendency to complexify everything, I believe we should be doing exactly the opposite.” Deaf people communicate in a language that is effective and despite the complexity of concepts they can communicate the language itself is simple and direct. Bruno emphasises several areas where the hearing world need to look at the way the deaf communicate and copy their behaviours.

Deaf-tips

– Look in the eyes

– Put yourselves in the other’s shoes

– Be simple and precise simultaneously

– Don’t say don’t

– Ask questions

 

Kahne uses emotive and strong examples of the way deaf people interact with each other and the world around them and the way the hearing world can learn from them.

“Deaf people can be seen in two different ways, either as people who have lost something – hearing – or as people who have gained something – the ability to communicate without sound.”

In the first case, Hearing people will express at best compassion, which will be perceived as offensive. In the second case, pity will be replaced by curiosity, respect for the difference, and desire to learn communication skills which are rarely found in the Hearing world

Truly handicapped people are not those with a malfunctioning body or mind, but those who have developed habits which prevent them from connecting with others in a healthy way. And as the world is moving away from discrimination and narrow-mindedness, maybe it is time to recognize the real experts in communication and learn from them.

If you wish to purchase Bruno’s book by the same name it is available  here and the full talk is also available on The PM Channel.

Roy Sheppard – Being upbeat in a downbeat world!

Roy-SheppardRoy Sheppard was a radio and television broadcaster, mainly with the BBC but also at HTV Wales in Cardiff and LBC Radio in London. He regularly worked alongside other notable presenters including Jeremy Paxman, Eamonn Holmes, Ann Robinson and the late Jill Dando and from 1985-91, he was an anchorman of the early evening news for the BBC in London.

Roy Sheppard is a specialist conference moderator, an experienced speaker and the author of eight books. As a moderator, Roy works on high-profile conferences for some of the world’s largest and most respected organisations. As well as being an acknowledged expert on building profitable business relationships through networking and referrals and he has worked as a visiting lecturer at Cranfield University’s full-time MBA course and more recently at Henley School of Management.

Roy Sheppard believes being upbeat, or downbeat, is a choice and in this talk he doesn’t claim to tell us anything we don’t already know. Roy shares his own methodology for developing what he calls your “Emotional Core,” including how to be emotionally stronger, more flexible and capable of dealing with whatever life seems to throw at us each and every day.

Roy opens the talk by asking the audience, have you ever been on a course on being happy? Roy questions that arguably the most important lesson in life isn’t taught or discussed.

Roy uses his experience and training as a therapist to declare that the number one reason in the world for unhappiness is that we create an image of what reality should be in our heads and then spend all of our time trying to make that image a reality and becoming unhappy when that image isn’t realised.

According to Roy we self-medicate, in order to try and convince ourselves we are happy we eat fast food, sugar and consume alcohol, “we can’t be up all the time, but we’re stimulation junkies. We want to be up all the time.”

Instead of looking for stimulation that is fleeting and possibly damaging Roy encourages us to identify the upbeat and downbeat people in our lives and instead focus on surround ourselves with positive influences.