Qualifications


PRINCE2 or APM?

PRINCE2 or APM? How do I choose

Introduction

Projects rely on teams of individuals to deliver change. These teams need a combination of both the skills to do the work and a structured method or framework within which the work can be done. Without both of these in place a project is likely to fail to achieve its objectives. Collectively, APM and PRINCE2 provide both of these essential elements.

This document explains how they do this and provides guidance to those deciding which path to go down. It is important to stress that the APM BoK and PRINCE2 approaches are complimentary and not competitive.

What is PRINCE2?

PRINCE2 (PRojects IN Controlled Environments) is a process-based method for effective project management. It is a de facto standard used extensively by the UK Government and is also widely recognised and used in the private sector, both in the UK and internationally.

The PRINCE2 method provides its users with a structured project lifecycle and appropriate management ‘gates’ to facilitate control which support good governance. The processes detail what activities need to be done at each stage of the lifecycle together with the roles and responsibilities of the team.

The method focuses on the project having a continuous business justification, a defined organisation structure for the project management team and a product-based planning approach. Knowledge of the PRINCE2 method is tested by examination at two different levels.

It is important to understand that the PRINCE2 method is not a ‘one size fits all’. Success in implementing it is highly dependent on how it is tailored for different size projects and the nature of the organisation.

What is APM BoK?

The Association for Project Management (APM) does not provide or advocate a particular method, but rather it is a framework within which projects should be run. The APM Body of Knowledge identifies the key areas of knowledge that those working in projects need to know and apply. The APM Body of Knowledge is promoted through qualifications, accredited training, research, publications and events. These key areas of knowledge are tested by examination at four levels.

Factors to consider in deciding which is most appropriate for my organisation. Do you have the essential knowledge and skills to undertake projects? Look to objectively assess or benchmark your project managers to determine their project management overall competence. If this shows that knowledge and skills are in need of development, then consider APM first.

Are you introducing a new project management method or a major overhaul of your existing method? If so, consider PRINCE2, but look to apply PRINCE2 in a tailored and appropriate way to suit your organisation. Also do think about PRINCE2 method education for project staff levels above and below project managers in order to maximise your success in implementing the method.

Do you have a project management method, but wish to improve the project management understanding of your people and perhaps refine and improve the method in places? Because APM BoK provides both the key principles and a broad understanding of project management, it can help cement the importance of applying a project management method, and is not limited to deployment of a specific method. Hence, APM BoK should be considered as the first approach for such a situation.

Do you lack the skills and the project management method? If so, then consider a combination of APM BoK to embed an overall framework and project management principles, followed by a tailored and appropriately sized application of PRINCE2 to provide the detailed method for project teams to follow.

How does APM differ from PRINCE2?

APM and PRINCE2 are not competing methods of project management. APM training and qualifications are designed to ensure that individuals and teams have the appropriate generic knowledge and understanding in the key areas and principles of project management. APM training is appropriate for anyone involved in project management. It provides the foundation for using project management methods such as PRINCE2.

PRINCE2 provides users with a structured process driven methodology suitable for any organisation undertaking projects. PRINCE2 related training is most suitable to those either using (or about to use) the PRINCE2 method or one that is based on PRINCE2. It will also benefit those who do not work in a PRINCE2 environment as its general principles and emphasis on structure and deliverables will facilitate best practice.

Advantages and disadvantages:

The advantages and disadvantages of deploying APM’s framework or PRINCE2 as a method will depend on the specific situation within each individual organisation. However, there are some general advantages and disadvantages that an organisation should be aware of before selecting their own approach.

PRINCE2 – Advantages: It is an internationally recognised best practice method. It is free to use and is supported by the APM Group Ltd. The training is accredited and provides qualifications to individuals at two levels. It supports governance. It can be used in any organisation for any size of project. As a standard method it can be rolled out across an organisation to provide a common language and support consistency.

PRINCE2 – Disadvantages: It is often seen as bureaucratic if not understood and applied appropriately. In addition, like any method, it can take time and effort to roll it out across an entire organisation. The language can be off putting for those unfamiliar with project management methods. The ‘soft skills’ of project management such as stakeholder management and conflict management are not covered within PRINCE2.

APM BoK – Advantages: It is internationally recognised through its alignment to IPMA and provides accredited qualifications. It is generic and does not rely on one particular method. It provides knowledge and understanding in a wide range of topics for anyone working in a project environment. APM also recognises important ‘soft skills’ and covers topics such as stakeholder and communications management, negotiation, conflict management and teamwork. APM framework and principles can be applied to organisations with an existing project management method.

APM BoK – Disadvantages: The APM BoK and the exam syllabuses cover a wide range of topics. The emphasis is on breadth rather than on depth. APM does not provide a specific method with ready to use templates.

Qualifications

There are two levels of PRINCE2 accreditation available for individuals: Foundation and Practitioner. The Foundation qualification is the first of two qualifications required to become a PRINCE2 Practitioner.

The Foundation exam aims to measure whether a candidate can act as an informed member of a project management team using the PRINCE2 methodology within a project environment supporting PRINCE2.

The Practitioner is the second of the two PRINCE2 examinations you are required to pass to become a PRINCE2 Practitioner. This PRINCE2 examination is aiming to measure whether a candidate would be able to apply PRINCE2 to the running and managing of a project within an environment supporting PRINCE2. To this end they need to exhibit the competence required for the Foundation qualification, and show that they can apply and tune PRINCE2 to address the needs and problems of a specific project scenario.

APM Introductory Certificate – is for anyone looking to understand the basic principles of project management. APMP Certificate – is a knowledge based qualification. Successful candidates are able to participate in projects from individual assignments through to large capital projects. APMP is a qualification recognised both nationally and internationally that successful candidates can carry from one job to another or from one industry to another. APMP Certificate is aligned to the IPMA (International Project Management Association) as a level D qualification. APMP does not require candidates to have first taken the Introductory Certificate.

APM Practitioner Qualification – is an assessment based event not a course, and is designed to test the ability of a practising project manager to manage a project against thirty criteria. It is the only qualification based project management assessment of its kind available in the UK. APM PQ is also an IPMA level C qualification. It is preferable, but not a pre-requisite, for candidates to have first taken the APMP certificate.

For senior project managers, there is also APM Certificated Project Manager (IPMA level B) which is a prestigious qualification with an extensive demonstrable track record of project success being required.

The Association for Project Management (APM) is the largest independent professional body of its kind in Europe with over 16,500 individual and 500 corporate members throughout the UK and abroad. Their aim is to develop and promote project management across all sectors of industry. At the heart of APM is the APM Body of Knowledge; fifty-two knowledge areas required to manage any successful project. The APM is currently seeking a Royal Charter to have project management recognised as a profession (2009).

The PM Channel offers you the possiblility to Study APM Introductory Certificate for £49/year and PRINCE2 Foundation and Practitioner, APMP for £149/year. You also get access to remote tutor support and exam readiness tests.

Project management exam readiness

Are you ready for your project management exam?

The PM Channel, in partnership with Provek’s proven online assessment tools, offers you the possibility to test your readiness for taking your project management exam.

Whatever exam you are preparing for we have the readiness test for you!

For each qualification course on The PM Channel, you can find a specific test aligned with the qualification syllabus to see if you are ready to pass the exam.  On completion of the test you will receive a short report which will advise you as to whether you are likely to pass the exam or not, and your current level of knowledge.

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APM Introductory certificate exam readiness:  This assessment comprises  40 questions and takes approximately 30 minutes.

APM Risk Management assessment:  This will help you measure your knowledge of risk management.  The assessment will take around 20 minutes to complete.

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PRINCE2 Foundation exam readiness:  The assessment comprises 10 PRINCE2 style questions and will take approximately 10 minutes.

PRINCE2 Practitioner exam readiness: This assessment takes approximately 15 minutes and comprises objective test questions similar to those used in the exam..

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PMI PMP exam readiness: This assessment takes approximately 40 minutes. This PMP exam readiness assessment will present you with a set of 35 questions. Following completion you will receive a report that gives your overall score and a breakdown into the PM BoK process areas.

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APMP course: test your readiness with the PMA5 Lite: This assessment takes approximately 30 minutes. This online assessment tool has been undertaken by over 8,000 programme and project management.  It also helps you to decide which APM qualification is the most suitable for you.

For more information about all our qualifications, please go to The PM Channel or contact us by email enquiries@thepmchannel.com or by telephone +44 1635 524610.

PMI PMP training on The PM Channel

PMI PMP training course joined the Qualification Package on The PM Channel.

 

PMI-PMP

PMI PMP preparation workshop, designed by PCMi, to help students to earn the PMP examination certificate by preparing them to pass the PMP exam.

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This workshop is divided onto 18 modules and offers 35h of study.

The objective of the course are:

  • To provide a broad base of information, aligned to the PMBOK Guide to enable students to be prepare to take the PMP Examination.
  • To develop an understanding of when and how to use recognised tools and techniques on projects.
  • To develop an understanding of specific PMI definitions and terminology.
  • To gain an understanding of the PMP examination format and typical question styles.
  • To develop a study plan for passing the PMP examination.
  • To satisfy the 35 hour formal project management training requirement for future professional certification with PMI.

Discover how to:

  • Gain exposure and awareness of the broad range of project management terms used within the workplace and  the PMP exam.
  • Understand existing project management knowledge and where further study is required prior to undertaking the PMP exam.
  • Know the effort required in order to pass the PMP exam.

PMP modules on The PM Channel:

Session 1: Introduction
Session 2: Project Management Framework
Session 3: Project Lifecycle & Organisation
Session 4: Project Management Process Groups
Session 5: Initiating Process Group
Session 6: Planning Process Group
Session 7: Project Scope Management Planning
Session 8: Project Time Management Planning
Session 9: Project Cost Management Planning
Session 10: Project Quality Management Planning
Session 11: Project Human Resource and Communication Planning
Session 12: Project Risk Management Planning
Session 13: Procurement Planning
Session 14: Executing Process Group
Session 15: Monitoring and Controlling Process Group
Session 16: Earned Value Management
Session 17: Closing Process Group
Session 18: Personal Study Plan

Recommended further reading:

A guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®), Fourth Edition.

The Qualifications Package is available for £149/year on The PM Channel. It gives you access to the 6 major project management courses ( APM IC, APMP, APM Risk Management Level 1, PRINCE2 Foundation and Practionner, PMI PMP)

Watch the presentation of PMI Project Management Professional certification:

 

Which project management qualification is right for you?

What recognised project management qualifications are available?

The figure below summarizes the core project management qualifications available and indicates the job roles most appropriate for each qualification.  This article is drawn from the useful project management qualification guide produced by Provek

Roles relevant for each project management qualification or certificate APM APMG PMI
Project team member, New project manager, Project office staff including Co-ordinator/planner. (Project experience not required, but advantageous). APM Introductory Certificate PRINCE2 Foundation CAPM Certification(Certified Associate of Project Management)
Project Manager (Junior), Work Package Manager, Project Office Manager (typically min 2-3 years project experience) APMP PRINCE2 Practitioner PMP (Project Management Professional)
Project Manager (typically min 3 years managing non complex projects) APM Practitioner Qualification (PQ) None None
Senior Project Manager (typically min. 5 years managing complex projects) Designation: Registered Project Professional (RPP) None None
Programme ManagerProgramme Director None, but considering introducing a qualification MSP (Managing Successful Programmes) Foundation, Practitioner and Advanced qualifications. PgMP (Programme Management Professional)

In addition to the above broad based project management qualifications and certifications, both the APM and APMG offer project risk management qualifications.  Provek provide public and in-house risk management certification courses which includes the examination.

To understand more about the qualifications and how they best suit your needs please see the answers to the questions below.

What are the benefits of achieving a qualification or certification?
Who are the recognised Project Management bodies?
Is there benefit in achieving more than one qualification?
Is there any benefit in achieving both APM and PRINCE2 qualifications?
How do I choose between APM or PRINCE or PMI qualifications?
Do training courses include the examinations or are they separate?
If an individual does not pass the examination, can they re-sit?
APM are planning to achieve chartered status.  What does this mean? 
What is the cost for attending training and taking the examination?

What are the benefits of achieving a project management qualification or certification?

Both an individual and the organisation they work for should benefit from an individual achieving a project management qualification or certification. Dependent upon the nature of the organisation and its business, some of the key potential benefits are as follows.

Benefits to the organisation:
  • Best-practice knowledge, skills, tools and techniques acquired through the training necessary to achieve a qualification are deployed back in the work place.
  • Improved capability and competence to deliver an organisation’s programmes or projects, resulting in increasing customer satisfaction and reputation, saving costs, utilising resources more effectively and positively impacting morale.
  • Supports individuals with their personal and career development planning. This in turn can result in increased appreciation of, and commitment to the organisation, by the individual.
  • Catalyses improvements to an organisation’s own project or programme management methods and processes through gaining an understanding of best-practice.
  • Enhances the credibility of the organisation to own clients and customers through having project or programme staff that have achieved externally recognised certification or qualification.
  • External recognition of an individual’s project management knowledge and capabilities indicating a core level of embedded understanding, which is then likely to be applied back in the work place.
Benefits to the individual:
  • Provides the individual with additional and portable knowledge, skills, tools and techniques in order to be more successful in managing and delivering projects or programmes.
  • Enhances career development prospects through having achieved an externally recognized qualification or certification.
  • Demonstrates to the employer, the individual’s desire, commitment and capabilities to learn and improve themselves, and thus improving an individual’s reputation within the organisation.
  • Provides an external industry-wide benchmark of an individual’s project management knowledge and competence.

Who are the recognised Project Management bodies?

There are three main recognised bodies for project management who provide a range of project management best-practice methodology, principles, qualifications, certifications and professional membership.  Reassuringly, there is considerable overlap concerning what each of the three bodies considers as best-practice project management.

The differences between the three bodies tends to be more related to the level, focus, breadth and depth of project management principles, processes, techniques and methods rather than there being any fundamentally conflicting views about best-practice project management.

The three main recognised project management bodies are:

  • Association for Project Management (APM) – The APM is the largest independent professional body of its kind in Europe with over 20,000 individual and 500 corporate members throughout the UK and abroad. Their aim is to develop and promote project management across all sectors of industry. At the heart of APM ethos is the APM Body of Knowledge (APM BoK), comprising fifty-two knowledge areas required to manage any successful project. APM BoK provides a framework and key principles for managing projects. Training and examinations are delivered through APM Accredited Training Providers. The APM is currently seeking a Royal Charter to have project management recognised as a profession.  APM is headquartered in the UK.
  • APMG-International – APMG administer qualifications, certifications and accreditations on behalf of the Cabinet Office and before that the OGC (Office of Government Commerce). The Cabinet Office are the owners of the PRINCE2 method for managing projects and MSP for managing programmes. PRINCE2 is an acronym for PRojects In Controlled Environments. MSP is an acronym for Managing Successful Programmes. Training and examinations are delivered through APMG Accredited Training Organisations. PRINCE2 is a structured process-based method for effective project management. It is a de facto standard used extensively by the UK Government and is also widely recognised and increasingly used in the private sector. APMG is headquartered in the UK.
  • Project Management Institute (PMI) – The PMI is the largest global membership association for project management professionals. At the heart of the PMI philosophy is ‘A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide)’. The PMBOK Guide comprises core project management processes and techniques, and also includes professional responsibility. Training is delivered through PMI Registered Education Providers (REP). Examinations are delivered through separate approved assessment centres. This does not involve the REPs. Candidates schedule an examination directly with an approved assessment centre once their eligibility has been validated by PMI. PMI is headquartered in the USA.

Is there benefit in achieving more than one project management qualification?

Particularly for individuals pursuing a career in project and programme management, the qualifications can be seen as a ladder.  It is aligned with their increasing project or programme hands-on experience, level of role and required or expected competence.

For example, for an individual following an APM route, when new to project management they may take the APM Introductory Certificate examination to demonstrate a broad awareness of best-practice project management.  As the individual gains some project experience and becomes a work package manager of a large project or a project manager then APMP certification will provide formal recognition that an appropriate level of breadth and depth of best-practice knowledge has been acquired.  After the individual has been project managing for several years, taking the APM Practitioner Qualification can then be worthwhile to demonstrate an appropriate level of competence externally recognized. Also it is the only qualification involving project management assessment of its kind available in the UK.

Is there any benefit in achieving both APM and PRINCE2 qualifications?

Yes there can often be for many people. Some organisations deploy both APM and PRINCE2 training and qualifications. APM and PRINCE2 are not mutually exclusive, and are not competing methods of project management. For an individual project manager it can be advantageous to have an understanding of both APM and PRINCE2, for example in engaging with clients and suppliers who may use one or both approaches.

APM training and qualifications are designed to ensure that individuals and teams have the appropriate generic knowledge and understanding in the key areas and principles of project management. APM training is appropriate for anyone involved in project management. It provides the foundation for using project management methods such as PRINCE2. APM also includes consideration of softer skills aspects such as conflict management, negotiation, teamwork and leadership in a project environment.

PRINCE2 provides users with a structured process driven methodology suitable for any organisation undertaking projects. PRINCE2 related training is most suitable to those either using (or about to use) the PRINCE2 method or one that is based on PRINCE2. It will also benefit those who do not work in a PRINCE2 environment as its general principles and emphasis on structure and deliverables will facilitate best practice.

How do I choose between APM or PRINCE or PMI project management qualifications?

The figure below is to assist in considering which qualification or certification awarding body to follow:

Factors to consider APM APMG PMI
Syllabus based upon APM Body of Knowledge – 5th Edition (2006) and a 6th Edition (2012) has been released OGC’s PRINCE2 manual 2009 EditionOCG’s MSP manual 2007 Edition PMBOK 4th Edition 2008
Geography Mainly UK, increasing within Europe Mainly across Europe, founded in public sector US based, most globaly recognised
Professional membership available Yes, (but not linked to qualifications) No Yes (and requires PMP qualification)
Best-practice sharing/forums among members Yes (through specific interest groups and annual conference) No Yes (regional chapters)
Other factors to consider Qualifications fully aligned with IPMA (International Project Management Association) Levels A to C. APM progressing towards Chartered Status and register of Chartered Project Professionals (ChPP) New PRINCE2: 2009 edition due for formal issue mid 2009.Re-registration exam to maintain Practitioner status required after 3 to 5 years Eligibility requirements to satisfy prior to sitting any exams based on education attainment, relevant training hours and project experience.To retain certification status requires evidence of continuous professional development – CAPM every 5 years; PMP every 3 years.

In addition to the above factors, also consider the relevance to your own organisation or industry sector:

  • Consider if any of APM, PRINCE, MSP or PMI are already being deployed in own organisation.
  • Consider project management approach or method most common for own clients and to lesser degree own suppliers.
  • APM’s BoK provides broadest range of project management topics including both soft and hard skills. Provides framework, principles and rationale for each critical area of project management, but not a prescribed method.
  • PMI’s PMBOK provides core processes for project management and also incorporates professional responsibility of practitioners.
  • OGC’s PRINCE2 provides a process-driven structured method for project management.
  • OGC’s MSP manual provides a framework for managing programmes.

Should you require a more detailed comparison between APM and PRINCE2 specifically, please see Provek’s “PRINCE2 or APM – how do I choose” page.

Do training courses include the examinations or are they separate?

Most Provek qualification based training courses incorporate the examination at the end of a training course. The training course will also provide examination question advice, tips and practice to help prepare the candidate. There are also self-study options for some courses, which require minimum or no classroom time. Should the candidate prefer this latter option, they simply attend the classroom to sit the examination.

If an individual does not pass the examination, can they re-sit?

Yes. There is also a significantly reduced charge for re-sitting an examination. Also normally there is no minimum timescale before a candidate can re-sit. The re-sit exam should be scheduled to a timescale that suits the other time commitments of the individual and allowing sufficient revision and study time.

APM are planning to achieve chartered status. What does this mean?

If the APM achieve chartered status then it will become the body responsibility for setting standards and creating a code of conduct for the profession of project management in the UK. Once the APM has chartered status, it can then set up a register of chartered project professionals by assessing and admitting people who meet the standard for chartered status.

At present, the designation of registered project professional (RPP) has been implemented as a forerunner to the  chartered project professional (ChPP).

Download this paper on which project management qualification as a pdf

Is the APMP Certificate right for you?

The APMP Certificate gives in-depth knowledge of project management across 37 topics.  It is a Level D qualification in the International Project Management Association’s (IPMA) four level certification.

Compared to PRINCE2 Practitioner (including Foundation) project management qualification, the APMP Certificate requires slightly more  study time,  covers a much broader range of project management topics and is pitched at a slighter  higher level of difficulty.

Pass rates for the APMP are around 70% nationally.  The examination lasts for  three hours and comprises 10 written answers from a choice of 16 questions.

APMP is well suited for people who are a work-package manager on a significant project, or managing a project, or who are managing project support offices.

If you want to hear more, please watch Neil Mooney explaining the APMP Certificate  in three  minutes on The PM Channel.

Also, Julian Foster, programme  manager at BAA, can be watched  talking about how they  use the APMP.

Although there are no mandatory pre-requisites for the APMP Certificate project management qualification we recommend that candidates thinking of attending a course have good project management basic skills or attendance on the APM Introductory Certificate course plus ideally a minimum of 6 months actual experience of working on a project.

We recommend delegates take Provek’s free online PMA5 lite assessment to help assess readiness and suitability for the APMP Certificate course and exam. This assessment identifies the delegate’s existing knowledge and experience and recommends the appropriate level of training required.

The syllabus for the APMP covers a broad range of 37 topics from the APM Body of Knowledge .

Topics covered include:

Portfolio and programme management

Concepts

  • The project context and stakeholder management
  • The project lifecycle and business processes
  • Developing a business case, investment  appraisal techniques
  • Risk management
  • Project strategy and constructing the project management plan
  • Scope management and breakdown
  • Structures
  • Time and resource scheduling
  • Budgets and cost control
  • Change control and configuration
  • Management
  • Teamwork and communication
  • Procurement and contracts
  • Conflict and negotiating skills
  • Handover and project closure
  • Exam preparation and exam practice  questions, exercises and scored feedback

The learning objectives and questions focus on list, state, describe and explain.

A majority of classroom courses are five-days in duration and usually require pre-course study.  The three hour written examination is taken on the last day.  Other formats are available, including modular (typically two 3-day modules) and blended (on line self study followed by 3-day classroom course).

Complete on line self study formats of project management training for studying the APMP are available on The PM Channel.

Studying for APM Introductory Certificate on The PM Channel

The APM Introductory Certificate gives you broad knowledge of project management focused on the definition of key terms.

If you are interested in a self study distance learning course, the on demand video project management training solution on The PM Channel for the APM Introductory Certificate is worthwhile considering.

This comprises 18 modules covering the full syllabus and also has a number of exercises with model solutions and practise examination questions with answers.   The total study time is recommended at between 10 and 15 hours.

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To see what it is like, you can try a couple of the modules out for free.  Information about the examination, including practise questions are available as well as one module on Project Lifecyles and Project Reviews.

The APM Introductory certificate is available on the Introductory Certificate for £49/ year.

Is the APM Introductory Certificate suitable for you?

The APM Introductory Certificate project management qualification gives you broad knowledge of project management focused on definition of key terms.

Compared to PRINCE2 Foundation qualification, the APM Introductory Certificate project management qualification requires less study time (about two-thirds that of PRINCE2 Foundation), covers a broader range of project management topics and is pitched at about the same level of difficulty.

It is great for people who are about to be a team member on a significant project, or who are needing to be a work-package manager on a project, or who are needing to manage their own small departmental project.

If you want to hear more, please watch Neil Mooney explaining the APM Introductory Certificate in a couple of minutes on The PM Channel.

This qualification has no pre-requisites and people from a wide range of different backgrounds successfully have achieved the APM Introductory Certificate. They have had backgrounds such as personal assistant, marketing consultant, finance administrator and engineering technician.

However generally, most people who choose the APM Introductory Certificate have had some exposure to projects and project management in their jobs.

The syllabus for the qualification covers a broad range of topics from the APM Body of Knowledge and most of the 60 questions in the one hour multiple choice examination are based on correct definition of key terms in project management.

Topics covered include:

• Project Management
• Programme and Portfolio Management
• Project Success and Benefits Management
• Project Context and Stakeholder Management
• Project Life Cycles & Project Reviews
• Business Case
• Project Sponsorship & Organisational Roles
• Project Management Plan (PMP) and Reporting
• Scope Management
• Scheduling
• Estimating
• Risk Management
• Project Quality Management
• Change Control and Issue Management
• Configuration Management
• Procurement
• Communication
• Teamwork and Leadership

However, the depth of study is limited to mainly definitions and so the learning objectives for scheduling for example are:

• Define scheduling
• Define total float and the term critical path
• Define Gantt (bar) chart
• Define baseline
• Define milestone

Most classroom courses are two-days in duration and require little or no pre-course study. The one hour examination is taken at the end of the second day.  On line self study courses are also available.

A new on demand video project management training course for the APM Introductory Certificate is available on The PM Channel.